On the psycholinguistics of preverbal modifiers in Hungarian
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On the psycholinguistics of preverbal modifiers in Hungarian adult intuitions and children"s treatment of modifiers by Csaba Ple h

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Published by Mouton/de Gruyter [for] Societas Linguistica Europaea in Berlin .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Offprint from: Folia linguistica, 23 (1-2).

StatementCsaba Ple h, Farrell Ackerman & Andra s Komlo sy.
ContributionsAckerman, Farrell., Komlo sy, Andra s.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13940996M

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LFG(-friendly) analyses of Hungarian sentence structure (subsection ). On É. Kiss (, , ) In her influential GB approach, É. Kiss (, ) treats (preverbal) quantifiers as constituents adjoined to VP, which is, basically, a Hungarian style, overt manifestation of GB’s famous Q-Raising operation. (If there is. Chapter 2 of this book has argued that in the Hungarian sentence, the primary locus of the marking of event type (or, in a different terminology, the primary locus of the marking of situation aspect) is the immediately preverbal slot, identified as Spec,PredP. Revisiting non-parting verbal particles in Hungarian Chenchen (Julio) Song, [email protected] Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics Gonville & Caius College, University of Cambridge 13th International Conference on the Structure of Hungarian Budapest, June Bartos, Huba b, ‘Topics, quantifiers, subjects: the preverbal field in Chinese and Hungarian’, paper presented at the International Symposium on Topic and Focus in Chinese, June 21–22, , Hong Kong Polytechnic University, to appear in Sze-Wing Tang and Dingxu Shi (eds.), Topic and Focus in Chinese.

Sentences like the one in (3) contain particle-verbs. In Hungarian, there is a large class of verbal modifiers (VM)2 that form a lexical unit with the V. They can modify the theta-grid or the c-selectional properties of the V. Following Neeleman’s () analysis for similar constructions in Dutch, I take the Hungarian particle verb to form a. On the psycholinguistics of preverbal modifiers in Hungarian: Adult intuitions and children's treatment of modifiers. Folia Linguistica 23/1–2: – (Társszerzők: Farrell Ackerman és Pléh Csaba) Magyarul: Az igemódosítók pszicholingvisztikájáról. Általános Nyelvészeti Tanulmányok . Between a preverbal direct object and a following verb in clause-final position, nuclear stress in German (the strongest stress in the intonation phrase) is assigned to the object as in (1). This is the case as long as the object has not undergone syntactic scrambling. By contrast, nuclear' stress is found. Between a preverbal direct object and a following verb in clause-Wnal position, nuclear stress in German (the strongest stress in the intonation Peter has a book sold argument, and modifier must be accented, with the exception of a predicate that, discounting unfocused constituents, is adjacent to an argument’ (p. 84).

  The complementary distribution of preverbal positive and negative quantifiers This section is devoted to a phenomenon which can be captured in the most simple way under the analysis of Hungarian negative quantifiers as universal quantifiers. In Hungarian, preverbal positive and negative universal quantifiers are in comple- mentary distribution. Verb modifier (VM) is a somewhat loosely defined notion in Hungarian generative grammars (see, for example, Bródy , É. Kiss , ), subsuming various different categorial and functional types of dependents of the verb that occupy an immediately preverbal position in neutral clauses. psycholinguistics. STUDY. PLAY. Implicit knowledge. Implied or understood though not directly expressed. Explicit knowledge is easy to communicate, store, and distribute and is the knowledge found in books, on the web, and other visual and oral means. Opposite of tacit knowledge. Scrambling Although the Japanese basic constituent order is SOV, the preverbal constituent order can be reversed, i.e. word permutation. This phenomenon is called scrambling. English has a relatively rigid phrase structure, but as shown in (11), Japanese allows scrambling before the verb.